Corticosteroid dosage for dogs

Dosing should be individualized based on disease and patient response :

Initial dose: 5 to 60 mg orally per day
Maintenance dose: Adjust or maintain initial dose until a satisfactory response is obtained; then, gradually in small decrements at appropriate intervals decrease to the lowest dose that maintains an adequate clinical response

Comments :
-Exogenous corticosteroids suppress adrenocorticoid activity the least when given at the time of maximal activity; consider time of maximal adrenal cortex activity (2 to 8 AM) when dosing.
-The delayed-release tablets act similarly to the immediate-release tablets except for the timing of drug release; active drug is released from the delayed-release tablets approximately 4 to 6 hours after intake.
-Alternate day therapy may be considered in patients requiring long-term treatment; it may be necessary to return to a full suppressive daily dose in the event of acute flare-ups.

Uses: As an anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agent when corticosteroid therapy as appropriate, such as for the treatment of certain allergic states; nervous system, neoplastic, or renal conditions; endocrine, rheumatologic, or hematologic disorders; collagen, dermatologic, ophthalmic, respiratory, or gastrointestinal diseases; specific infectious diseases or conditions related to organ transplantation.

Corticosteroids can produce reversible hypothalamic- pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for corticosteroid insufficiency after withdrawal of treatment. Adrenocortical insufficiency may result from too rapid withdrawal of corticosteroids and may be minimized by gradual reduction of dosage. This type of relative insufficiency may persist for up to 12 months after discontinuation of therapy; therefore, in any situation of stress occurring during that period, hormone therapy should be reinstituted. If the patient is receiving steroids already, dosage may have to be increased.

Increased risk of asthma-related deaths and hospitalizations. Do not initiate in rapidly or acutely deteriorating asthma. Not for relief of acute bronchospasm. Not for use with other long-acting β 2 -agonists or for transferring from systemic steroids. Reevaluate periodically. Do not exceed recommended dose. Cardiovascular disease (esp. coronary insufficiency, arrhythmias, hypertension). Convulsive disorders. Thyrotoxicosis. Hyperresponsiveness to sympathomimetics. Diabetes. Ketoacidosis. Hypokalemia. Hyperglycemia. Hepatic impairment (monitor). Tuberculosis. Untreated infections. Ocular herpes simplex. Eosinophilic conditions. Immunosuppressed. If exposed to chickenpox or measles, consider immune globulin prophylactic therapy. If adrenal insufficiency exists following systemic corticosteroid therapy, replacement with inhaled corticosteroids may exacerbate symptoms of adrenal insufficiency (eg, lassitude). Prescribe a short-acting, inhaled β 2 -agonist for acute symptoms; monitor for increased need. Monitor potassium, intraocular pressure; bone mineral density if other osteoporosis risk factors exist; and for growth suppression in children; hypercorticism and HPA axis suppression (if occurs, discontinue gradually). Do not use with spacers. Labor & delivery. Pregnancy (). Nursing mothers: not recommended.

The discontinuation of prednisone dog treatments should be gradual and performed over several weeks, because if this procedure is not respected, the dog may be affected by hyperadrenocorticism (commonly known as Cushing's disease ) or even adrenal gland insufficiency. This is due to the fact that the cortisone will stimulate the adrenal gland and if the treatment is suddenly discontinued, the adrenal glands may either fail to produce the needed amounts of hormones or produce these hormones in excess. The adrenal glands have to get accustomed to not getting prednisone, by slowly reducing the amounts of prednisone the dog gets.

I have never written a review on anything really, but I thought it was important in this case. I have been dealing with arthritis for probably 15 years. I was essentially given two choices: the first is take Allopurinol and hope it prevents me from getting sprouts. However, I would have to take a 20 mg pill every day, and this medication has upset my stomach in the past. Option two is to treat an outbreak when it occurs with the medication. I went this route, and took Colchicine, which is the medication to treat this. The problem is that it never seemed to work, and I recently had a terrible gout attack. I got Prednisone and it really worked miracles. I was probably 70% better after one full day, and now almost 100% after three days. I am more than satisfied with this medication!

Corticosteroid dosage for dogs

corticosteroid dosage for dogs

The discontinuation of prednisone dog treatments should be gradual and performed over several weeks, because if this procedure is not respected, the dog may be affected by hyperadrenocorticism (commonly known as Cushing's disease ) or even adrenal gland insufficiency. This is due to the fact that the cortisone will stimulate the adrenal gland and if the treatment is suddenly discontinued, the adrenal glands may either fail to produce the needed amounts of hormones or produce these hormones in excess. The adrenal glands have to get accustomed to not getting prednisone, by slowly reducing the amounts of prednisone the dog gets.

Media:

corticosteroid dosage for dogscorticosteroid dosage for dogscorticosteroid dosage for dogscorticosteroid dosage for dogscorticosteroid dosage for dogs

http://buy-steroids.org